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A New Method to Pick the Correct Tee Box

Another Method to Help You Play From Your Correct Tee Box

So I tried earlier to convince you to pick the correct tee box.  If that didn’t work, why not check out this infographic?

In my never-ending pursuit of more knowledge, I picked up Jeff Summitt’s (Hireko Golf) newest edition of his book The Modern Guide to Golf Clubfitting.  

One thing right in the beginning struck me, which inspired me to make this infographic.  I think it can do most of the talking, so I won’t say too much.

Breaking Down the Infographic

So what do we see?  To shoot par, you’d need 72 strokes.  From there:

  • On average, you take 36 putts/round
  • That means you have to cover everything that isn’t a putt with only 36 strokes!

If you’re a typical (yes, it’s a YMMV thing) golfer, you’re getting around 215 yards off the tee box.

That means, if the course is 7,200 yards and you use the driver on 14 holes (a typical course setup), you’re covering 3,010 of the 7,200 yards you need to get through!  That’s less than half of the entire course!

What’s that leave us with?  4,190 more yards.  Yikes!

What do you do?  Of those 36 strokes, 14 are dedicated to the long-range tee shot.  That leaves you with only 22 strokes to cover almost 4,200 yards!

surprised about golf not being difficult

For 22 shots, that’s an average of about 190 (190.5 if we wanna be technical) yards per shot.  The average golfer (which, if you’re reading this, is probably you), has to decide between a smooth 3-wood of a full 5-wood.  But what if they don’t carry a 5-wood?

Pick the Correct Tee Box!

This is why picking the correct tee box is so important.  In the final example of the infographic, if you moved up from 7,200 yards to 5,800, you only need to cover 2,790 yards.  That’s about 127 yards per shot with the 22 you have left.  A much more manageable 8-iron!

Is This a More Useful Solution?

I will say that it’s a very interesting take.  Seems more immediate when you think about the numbers that go into it, as well.  If you’re wondering, yes, you can enter your own personal numbers to get the exact yardage for your own game.  In a word, it’s flexible!

I want to stress- again- that par should be a reasonably attainable goal, regardless of your skill level.  That’s not me talking; that’s former USGA Tech Director Frank Thomas (Frankly Golf) saying it, in his book Just Hit It.

Why in hell would you want to slog away to a 110?  If you move up a set of tees and routinely break par, then think about moving back a set of tees.  Honestly, you don’t have to… just enjoy the awesome feeling of shooting excellent scores and the ability to spend more time doing other things that are important to you.  Like taking pictures of your golf clubs:

DTG S2 Pro

I took this pic!

RELATED: Struggling with your game?  Let a Jedi Master help!

Reframe How You’re Deciding Which Tee Box to Use

Think about it in a different context; if you’re messing around playing Slam Dunk Contest in your driveway, do you leave the rim at 10 feet, or do you lower it?

Moving up a tee box is similar to lowering the rim.  When you develop your leg muscles, allowing you to jump higher, you can raise the rim.  Or not; it’s up to you.

In golf, as you see scores continually drop from a more forward set of tees, you can move back.  Or not.

But if you’re having fun with a shorter rim, so what?  Same goes for tee boxes… if you’re playing from, say, 5,800 yards, shooting good scores and having fun, so what?

One more look at the infographic, for the road:

How about you? Which is your favorite tee box?

About the Author

Justin Blair is the founder of Green Lantern Golf. When he isn't bringing his 10+ years of excellent craftsmanship experience to golf club fitting, building, and repair, he's geeking out about Star Wars (he's watched them all about 8,437 times!) and things like the MCU and LOTR, he's drinking mead and craft brews. If you wanna know more, check out my About Page!

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