How Club Builders Can Go Green

There’s more than one way to “go green” in golf.

There are some fascinating things happening with hybrid grass; some are being developed that can withstand drought conditions.  That means, less water being used to keep the greens and fairways looking like emeralds.

We’re moving away from unnatural “phenomenons”- specifically, water fountains- because it’s a waste of water and electricity.

On the club builder’s end, there are a few ways we can “go green”.

The first thing that might not seem all that obvious is with grips.  Traditionally, you buy tape like this:

And you’d use either grip solvent, Naptha, or something like lighter fluid to “activate” the grip tape. As an aside, “grip solvent” is Naptha; most times, but not always.

how-to-build-putter go green

Anyway, when we want to “go green”, we have two options in this area:

  • Water-Activated grip tape, or
  • Air-on grips.

Water-activated is the more common approach.

You’d buy tape like this:

But there’s a catch: they aren’t technically “water-activated”. They work best if you mix a few dabs of dish soap in the water.

The last way to go green when gripping a club is by using air.

You’ll need two things:

  • An air compressor,
  • A special tool.

For the air compressor, I suggest something like this:

Unless you plan on having it be a big multiple-purpose household unit, you don’t need to spend a lot on a compressor, nor are you required to get a big one.  This will be more than enough.

As for the tool, here’s an example:

They’re not the cheapest thing, but they’re definitely worth it for installing grips with air.

If you’re a socially-conscious club builder, the latter two examples are the way to go.  While it’s always a good idea to have some kind of a catch-pan when you regrip your clubs, stuff happens sometimes.

By moving away from the harmful chemicals like Naptha, we can do our part to help preserve what we’ve got on earth, proving that golf is a green sport.

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